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Village shows its pro-business side PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by MARK JAEGER   
Wednesday, 05 November 2014 18:25

Community Development Authority backs companies’ requests to abandon road, combine parcels

The Village of Saukville’s Community Development Authority has recommended measures intended to accommodate the wishes of two industrial park businesses.

Rick Gebhardt of Injectec, 451 N. Dekora Woods Blvd., received a favorable review from the committee on a request to abandon the road reservation for an extension of Seyfert Court.

Gebhardt said the proposed road right of way, which only serves Injectec, could interfere with tentative expansion plans.

Officials had no problem with giving conceptual approval to abandoning the road, especially after noting that access to two adjacent undeveloped lots would be possible via the road to the village water tower.

Committee members said they would be willing to consider an offer from the company to purchase the Seyfert Court right of way because the road is not needed. A price has yet to be negotiated.

Presuming the road issue can be finalized, Gebhardt said he planned to return to the committee with expansion plans within the next year.

“Hopefully we will be able to stay in the community, because the community has been good to us,” he said.

With that assurance, the proposal gained support from the committee.

“It is not like we would abandon Seyfert Court and in six months we would find out we have to put a road in,” Trustee Mike Gielow said.

In another matter, Cramer Coil & Transformer, 401 N. Progress Dr., also gained support from the committee to consolidate four parcels it owns into a single property.

Village officials have been told that Cramer Coil, too, is posturing for future expansion.

The lot change was approved by the Village Board on Tuesday.

The CDA also recommended issuing a two-year, conditional-use permit to Saukville Feed Supply, 313 W. Church St., for the continued operation of a light bulb recycling facility.

Mill owner Nick Latsch first gained approval from the village for the temporary storage bin two years ago.  

The crushed bulbs are collected at the site and then sold to Veolia Environmental Services.

“Their biggest thing is keeping this glass out of the landfill, where it stays forever because it doesn’t biodegrade,” Latsch told village officials.

The bulbs are pulverized into fine pieces which are eventually used as sandblasting material.

Since the bulb collection began, Village Administrator Dawn Wagner said the staff at Saukville Feed has been conscientious about making sure broken glass debris is not tracked from the site.


 
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