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City to sharpen downtown upgrade plans PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 23 June 2010 18:08

Commission will review TIF proposal calling for $2.3 million in projects, including improvements to parking lots, coal dock

A host of downtown infrastructure improvements — everything from revamped parking lots and alleys to the conversion of Harborview Lane to a pedestrian way — will be discussed by the Port Washington Plan Commission Thursday, June 24.

The improvements, as well as proposed developer incentives, are among the projects in a tax-incremental financing plan that will be reviewed during a 6:30 p.m. public hearing.

“We’re trying to make it a more friendly downtown, especially with the changes to the parking lots to improve traffic flow and the alleys to improve pedestrian movement,” City Administrator Mark Grams said. 

“By making the downtown more attractive, hopefully we’ll attract more businesses there.”

The work will also demonstrate the city’s desire to see the downtown redeveloped, officials said.

The projects were scheduled to be reviewed for the first time on Wednesday by the TIF Joint Review Board, which is primarily made up of representatives of the various governmental units affected by the district.

The proposed district, which would contain properties valued at more than $13 million, would zigzag through the heart of downtown and include a number of vacant buildings that officials have said are ripe for redevelopment.

When these buildings are redeveloped, the increased property taxes would be used to pay for the estimated $2.3 million in public improvements included in the plan. The money must be repaid within 27 years.

“This will give us the opportunity to do these project without putting the burden on the taxpayers,” Grams said.

Among the expenditures and projects included in the proposed TIF plan are:

  • $90,000 for improvements to the coal dock.
  • $450,000 in improvements to downtown parking lots, including significant changes to the lot behind Smith Bros. Marketplace.
  • $40,000 for alley improvements, most of which are aimed at making it easier for people to get from Franklin Street to the lakefront.
  • $20,000 for downtown signs.
  • $750,000 in developer incentives.
  • Officials have said the incentives are needed to attract businesses to the larger vacant buildings downtown.
  • $390,000 for street improvements, including the changes to Harborview Lane near the north-slip marina — a project that officials said will provide a landscaped walkwayleading from downtown to the stairs that lead to the historic Light Station atop St. Mary’s Hill — the creation of a cul-de-sac at the end of South Milwaukee Street and elimination of the cul-de-sac at the east end of East Main Street.

A few of the TIF projects could be undertaken as soon as next year, Grams said, such as streetscaping and leveling of sidewalks on East Grand Avenue.

“Most of the big projects would be done in 2012 or later,” Grams said, including the conversion of Harborview Lane and improvements to the parking lot behind Smith Bros. Marketplace.

The TIF district is an important aspect of the city’s downtown redevelopment strategy, he said, but it’s not the only piece of the puzzle.

The economy, which has stifled development throughout the country, will play a major part, Grams said.

“Everything’s still tied into the economy,” he said.

Franklin Energy’s move to downtown will also help with redevelopment efforts, he said. The growing firm will move into the second floor of the Smith Bros. Marketplace building, bringing a significant influx of employees to the downtown.

“You’ll have more workers downtown generating more traffic for the stores there,” Grams said. “Hopefully, other businesses will come downtown with this added traffic.

“Will it happen overnight? Probably not. But in the long term, with the improvements we’re making, hopefully we can make a difference.”

Following Thursday’s public hearing at City Hall, the Plan Commission is expected to make a recommendation on the TIF district borders and plans to the Common Council.

Aldermen are expected to take up the matter when they meet on Tuesday, July 6. The Joint Review Board must then approve the borders and plans before they are submitted to the state for final approval.

 
City to change pond plan for Hwy. 33 work PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 16 June 2010 18:28

Port’s decision to relocate stormwater facility near Hwy. LL not likely to delay long-awaited project

With little discussion Tuesday, Port Washington aldermen agreed to move a planned stormwater detention pond that will be built as part of the long-awaited Highway 33 reconstruction.

Fears that the change in plans for the highway would delay the project may not come to fruition, Public Works Director Rob Vanden Noven said.

“I’ve talked to the designer, who is determined to let nothing stop the schedule,” Vanden Noven said, adding he was meeting with officials on Wednesday to discuss the project and its schedule. “It’s certainly possible to keep it on schedule, and we intend to do so.”

The reason, he said, is that the city made a quick decision in the matter.

City officials took a second look at the detention pond planned for the former Kolbach farm at the southwest corner of highways LL and 33 after learning it would not alleviate flooding in the area, especially near Second Avenue.

A study done by the engineering firm Bonestroo and reviewed by aldermen Tuesday revealed showed the planned pond would not handle the water from a two-year storm.

That is the biggest reason the city should move the pond to an area south of the Aurora medical Clinic on the southeast corner of the interchange, Ald. Tom Hudson said.

Building a 19-acre regional stormwater detention pond there, and doing some minor grading, would mean the facility could handle even a 100-year storm, according to the study.

“If we can fix it, let’s do so,” Hudson said, noting flooding problems have plagued area residents for years.

Matthew Bednarski, an engineer with Bonestroo, said that moving the pond will also help the city meet Department of Natural Resources water quality standards in 2013.

It would also allow the city to abandon the current dry stormwater pond in the Bley Park subdivision, Bednarski said, creating as many as two residential lots that could be sold.

The cost of the new pond was estimated at $535,000, Bednarski said. As much as $135,000 of that could be covered by a state grant, he said.

In addition, because it would create a regional stormwater pond, the city could assess future developers for part of the cost, Bednarski said.

He recommended the city negotiate with the Department of Transportation to ensure funds planned for the current pond would be transferred to the new facility.

The former Kolbach farm would lie fallow under the new plan, Vanden Noven told the council, noting that the state has restricted access to the property.

“It can’t be developed for anything,” he said.

The plan will, however, allow the city to keep a stand of woods that separates the Bley Park subdivision from Highway 33, something that’s important to residents there, Vanden Noven said.

The Highway 33 project, which runs from Tower Drive in Port Washington to just east of Highway W in Saukville, involves replacing the existing two-lane road with a four-lane divided highway, complete with turn lanes, curb and gutter, sidewalks, bike lanes, landscaping and lighting.

Three roundabouts are planned for the road. Two of them will be in Saukville, at Northwoods Road and Market Street. The third will be at the Highway LL interchange in Port.

Plans call for utility work to begin this fall and road construction next spring.

 
City loan to help renovate Smith Bros. building PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 09 June 2010 21:15

Port council agrees to provide firm with $125,000 to prepare for Franklin Energy

The City of Port Washington will loan Lighthouse Development $125,000 to renovate the Smith Bros. Marketplace building to accommodate Franklin Energy, which is moving its headquarters from the former St. John’s Church to downtown.

Aldermen last week unanimously approved the revolving fund loan to LDC-728, an offshoot of Lighthouse Development that will use the money to buy equipment, fixtures and furnishings and help finance capital expenses.

Although it’s good to see the firm preparing the second floor of the building for a tenant, Ald. Tom Hudson expressed frustration at the length of time that the building, which most people consider a gateway to downtown, has been largely vacant.

“This is all well and good, but I’ve been an alderman for almost 10 years and this thing’s been vacant almost the whole time I’ve been alderman,” Hudson said.

“Is this something they’re actively going to work on or is it just going to sit empty?”

Tom DeMuth, a partner in Lighthouse Development, replied, “I can assure you we’ve been looking for a tenant quite aggressively.”

The company has had as many as 30 restaurants looking at the first floor of the building, he said, but hasn’t found a tenant yet.

“You don’t think you might be priced too high?” Hudson asked.

Lighthouse has offered potential tenants “significant incentives” to lease the space, but none has taken the firm up on its offer, DeMuth said.

Tuesday’s loan agreement is the second time the Common Council has taken action in recent months to ensure Franklin Energy moves its operations downtown.

Last month, the city agreed to lease the firm’s current building on Foster Street and relocate the senior center there. The city will have the option to buy the former church after three years.

Franklin Energy’s move to the top floor of Smith Bros. Marketplace at the corner of Franklin Street and Grand Avenue is seen by many officials as a way to spur development in the downtown district by bringing more people to the area.

A report on the revolving loan prepared by the Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission stated that the Smith Bros. Marketplace building has not operated at a profit for the past three years. The structure has been vacant except for a coffeehouse on a corner of the first floor.

With the lease to Franklin Energy, the building should make a profit next year, the report states.

Lighthouse’s loan from the city would be matched by at least $200,000 in bank financing, the report states, adding that the firm is also considering applying for a $50,000 revolving loan from Ozaukee County.

The city’s loan would be secured with a third mortgage on the building if a pending appraisal is for at least $2.45 million, City Administrator Mark Grams said. If the appraisal isn’t that high, Lighthouse will put up another of its developments that has at least $150,000 in equity.

“There is a long list of properties they can offer up,” Mayor Scott Huebner said.

In return, Franklin Energy guarantees that at least seven new full-time jobs will be added, and most of these jobs will be recruited through the Workforce Development Center, the report states.

Kathleen Cady Schilling, executive director of the county’s economic development corporation, told the council that the firm will be moving 32 jobs to the building, 18 of them new positions.

If Franklin Energy does not meet its obligation to provide these new jobs, Lighthouse will pay a penalty, Huebner said.

The loan will be at 1.625% interest. The term of the loan will match the bank financing Lighthouse is seeking, officials said.

Ald. Burt Babcock questioned why Lighthouse is seeking the loan.

“At one time, I thought that Franklin Energy was going to do the work and use local contractors,” he said.

DeMuth said the building lease calls for Lighthouse to do the work using local firms.

 
Aldermen favor dog park over leash law change PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 02 June 2010 18:57

Port officials tell dog owners who want city to let pets run free on beach they favor establishing special park instead

A group of Port Washington residents told the Common Council Tuesday they would like the city to designate hours when they could let their dogs run unleashed on the north beach.

But several aldermen said they believe a dog park may be the better answer.

“I think having dogs off leash is a bad idea,” said Ald. Tom Hudson, who has two dogs and described himself as a dog lover.

“I think it would be great for us to look into the possibility of a dog park. If somebody wants to take the lead and work with Park and Rec to establish a dog park somewhere, it would be wonderful.”

Even with designated hours for dogs to be allowed off leash, Hudson said, “There’s always going to be someone out there who doesn’t want to be bothered by dogs.”

A group of about 10 dog owners attended Tuesday’s meeting, but only one spoke.

“We believe giving our pets sufficient exercise is a prime responsibility of a dog owner,” said Anne Davis, 920 Crestview Dr.

“We believe letting our dogs off leash on the beach to chase a stick in the water and swim is not the same thing as letting dogs run rampant. We walk at times and in places we’re unlikely to encounter others.”

If the city were to establish hours when dogs could run unleashed on the beach, Davis said, that doesn’t mean other people couldn’t use the beach at the same time.

Out of courtesy, she said, the pet owners would continue to leash their dogs when others are present.

“We are not asking for the abolition of the leash law,” Davis said.

Nor are they asking the city to stop enforcement of the pooper-scooper law, said Davis.

“We wholeheartedly agree this has become a problem,” she said.

In recognition of the fact that a few negligent pet owners can cause problems for all owners, Davis said, her group has frequently picked up after dogs that aren’t their own.

Since the police department began strictly enforcing the city’s pet laws last month, she added, the bike path has been cleaned.

Police Chief Richard Thomas said his department has issued 15 warning to pet owners violating the city’s various pet ordinances during the past month, many for allowing a dog to roam off leash.

“We feel pretty good about where we’re at,” Thomas said. “The response we’ve received from the community has been wonderful. I’m very pleased and happy.

“Now we’re ready to take it to the next level.”

The department will now issue tickets and fines to pet owners who violate the city ordinances, Thomas said.

“We want to preserve our reputation as a pet-friendly community,” he said, “but we have to be responsible, too.”

But the dog owners, many of whom have received warnings from police for allowing their pets off leash, find it frustrating that even if no one else is on the beach, they cannot allow their dogs to swim and run freely, Davis said.

The group plans to approach the Park and Recreation Board next week to see if it is willing to consider designating hours when dogs could be unleashed on the beach, she told aldermen.

Several aldermen said they would prefer the group put its efforts into establishing a dog park in the city.

Ald. Mike Ehrlich said he has been approached by several constituents willing to work on establishing a dog park in the city.

“I like the idea,” he said.

John Sigwart, 230 Theis St., told aldermen the former landfill site off Grant Street might be a good place for a dog park.

“It’s ideal,” he said. “The city owns it. It’s isolated.”

 
Street festival to turn the corner Sunday PDF Print E-mail
Community
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 26 May 2010 18:02

Third annual Port downtown celebration will add portion of Grand Avenue to Franklin Street activities

Port Washington residents and visitors will flock to downtown Sunday, May 30, for the third annual Community Street Festival.

This year, the festival will expand from Franklin Street onto Grand Avenue as new activities are added to the lineup.

“We’re very excited,” said Cathy Wilger, chairman of the festival’s organizing committee. “There are things people will recognize again and new activities, too. There’s a mix of activities for families to relax and have fun with.”

This year’s festival falls during Memorial Day weekend, a fact that organizers hope will draw more people to the event.

“Not everyone goes away for Memorial Day,” said Sara Grover, executive director of the Port Washington Main Street Program, which sponsors the festival. “We’re hoping that the people who stay in town will come on down and enjoy the many activities and see what our downtown shops and restaurants have to offer.”

The festival will also serve as a kickoff to events commemorating the City of Port Washington’s founding 175 years ago. Birthday balloons will festoon the streets, and birthday cake will be served.

The street festival will run from noon to 5 p.m., an hour longer than in past years, and encompass Franklin Street between Jackson Street and Grand Avenue as well as Grand Avenue from Wisconsin Street east to the lakefront.

While Franklin Street and East Grand Avenue will be closed throughout the festival, one lane will be open on Grand Avenue to accommodate people staying at the Holiday Inn Harborview.

People are asked not to park on Franklin Street Sunday morning to accommodate the festival.

Among the returning attractions will be a cakewalk, children’s games, bouncy room, face painting, chalk drawings, dance and fitness exhibitions at the Performing Arts Stage and musical performances.

This year’s event will feature the band Otto Day and the Nites at 1 p.m., as well as  music by Matt Tyner and Mike Brumm.

A variety of construction equipment will be on hand for children to explore. Photographs of the children will be taken on the vehicles.

Four charter boats will be giving free tours throughout the afternoon.

New this year will be a hole-in-one contest, with participants teeing off from Rotary Park to a hole across the west slip on the coal dock. The hole is 160 yards from the tee.

The prize is $1,000 cash. If two people make holes-in-one, a shootoff will be held for a second prize, a stay at the Fox Hills Resort.

The hole-in-one contest will cost $5 for three balls or $10 for eight.   

Downtown businesses will offer a wide range of shopping opportunities, and 23 eateries will provide a variety of outdoor drinking and dining choices.

The Main Street Program will begin collecting photographs of the city for its first photo calendar at the festival.

“We’re looking for photos of Port Washington, the people of Port Washington. We’re looking for life in Port Washington,” Grover said.

Photographs will be collected through July 1. Selected photos will be used by the Main Street Program for everything from the organization’s Web site to brochures and the calendar, which will first be available in August during Maritime Festival, Grover said.

The Port Washington Street Festival has quickly become a tradition for many city residents, Wilger said.

“What we’ve been told is a lot of Port Washington people come to this, they see people they haven’t seen for a while and end up staying the afternoon,” she said.

“They feel it’s a nice little community festival. It showcases the businesses we have here in town and lets people experience them. It offers something for everyone in the family.”


READY TO CELEBRATE this weekend at Port Washington’s third annual Community Street Festival on Franklin Street and East Grand Avenue and representing a few of the activities to be found there are (sitting) Angel Tello of Tello’s Grille and Cafe, (standing, from left) festival chairman Cathy Wilger, Mark “Chico” Poull of Schooner Pub, City Administrator Mark Grams, who is organizing a hole-in-one contest, and drummer Gary Klever and guitarist Jim Bathke, both of the band Otto Day and The Nites. Photo by Sam Arendt

 
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