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Port Washington

Remnants of Pirate Fest head to the auction block PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 24 July 2013 18:26

Merchandise, website will be sold to help pay bills from cancelled event

    The remnants of Port Washington Pirate Festival, everything from the name itself to the festival website and merchandise, will be put on the auction block soon, with the proceeds going to pay off the festival’s debt, founder Kim McCulloch said.

    “We want to make sure the opportunity’s out there for someone else — the city, businesses, the blues group — to carry on what we started,” McCulloch said. “If the parks department wants it, great. If the business owners want it, great. If civic groups want it, great.

    “As long as the city’s happy with them and wants to work with them, great. They (the city) obviously don’t want to work with us.”

    No one on Pirate Festival’s organizing committee is interested in bidding on the items, she said, although the members would work with the winning bidder to walk them through the process initially.

    “It would be a shame for this not to continue,” she said. “It’s pretty much a turnkey operation. We don’t have to be a part of it.”

    McCulloch said that Pirate Festival was started to help downtown businesses, a goal it had achieved.

    “It did a great job at that,” McCulloch said. “We made sure everyone went down to the businesses.”

    Pirate Festival, a popular event that kicked off the summer festival season in downtown Port Washington for eight years, was cancelled in April.

    Tensions between the city and the organizers had gotten so bad by that point that the Common Council approved plans for another event, Port Harbor Family Festival, to be held during the first week of June, when Pirate Fest was traditionally held.

    McCulloch said that the impact of cancelling Pirate Fest was significant.

    “The City of Port Washington needs Port Washington Pirate Festival, and the businesses do too,” she said.

    Although plagued by poor weather most years, Pirate Festival drew crowds of as many as 30,000 people to the city each year.

    But city officials said they were concerned about items that included a lack of security and clean-up, and said they wanted to see a more structured approach to the festival’s planning. The city asked for a variety of information, including a list of organizers, permit and license applications, certificate of insurance, a security contract and ground plans.

    That didn’t happen, officials said, adding the final straw came when a number of vendors from last year’s festival contacted them because they hadn’t been paid.

    McCulloch said she had been poorly treated by the city and because of that members of her organizing committee didn’t want their contact information given to officials. The city had also threatened to turn the festival over to others to run, she said, making her reluctant to turn over much of the information the city sought.    

    McCulloch said she is still working out the details of the auction, which she hopes to have completed by the end of September.

    Proceeds will go to help pay off the festival’s bills, she said, although she declined to say how much they total.

City takes next step in fowl-feeding law PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:57

Port council directs attorney to draw up ordinance that will make it illegal to feed ducks and geese

    The Port Washington Common Council on Tuesday directed City Attorney Eric Eberhardt to draw up an ordinance making it illegal to feed ducks and geese in the city.

    “I don’t think there’s any one of us who hasn’t fed the ducks and geese somewhere down the line and have fun doing it,” Ald. Bill Driscoll said.

    “But the waste from the birds is causing all kinds of hazards, not only for people but for other birds. It’s a terrible breeding ground for parasites and bacteria.”

    Birds that normally migrate become dependent on the food that people give them and don’t leave the area, Driscoll said.

    “We come in and feed these birds and they ignore nature and stay here,” he said.

    “If they move, the natural area has a chance to revive itself. But if they don’t leave, there is no chance for recovery.”

    The problem of waterfowl is most acute near the marina, where the birds soil the docks and walkways, said Driscoll, a member of the Harbor Commission, which recommended the law.

    And birds are likely to become a big problem at the coal dock, Ald. Dave Larson said. Before construction of Coal Dock Park began, he said, there were so many birds it was hard to see the ground.

    That could get even worse if people visiting the new park feed the waterfowl, he said. Their waste could make it impossible to even sit on the grass.

    “It would ruin everything we’ve done to beautify the coal dock and make it the gem we want it to be,” Larson said.

    Ald. Mike Ehrlich questioned how effective an ordinance would be in stopping people, especially since they can be seen feeding the waterfowl while standing next to the “Please don’t feed the birds” sign on the north end of the marina.

    “How do we really help the problem?” Ehrlich asked.

    Driscoll said education is the key.

    “It’s not just about making a law,” he said. “This isn’t a revenue-making thing. We don’t want the city to ticket 5-year-olds.”

    An ordinance would give police the power to inform people they can’t feed the birds and tell them why, Larson added.

    Mayor Tom Mlada said the city needs to take action now to prevent problems from occurring.

    He and his children recently went to a park in another community that birds frequent, Mlada said, “and you literally cannot walk anywhere without stepping in it (waste). It’s not fun.

    “Anything you can do to keep the birds away and mitigate the issue is fine.”

Commission asks aldermen to reconsider life-vest plan PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 10 July 2013 17:17

Officials voice concern about liability city may face if it installs waterfront kiosk

    Port Washington officials may be asked to reconsider their support for a loaner life vest program at the marina.

    The Harbor Commission on Monday expressed concerns about the liability and responsibility the city may be undertaking with the program, which was approved by aldermen last month.

    The life vests would be in a kiosk being built by Boy Scout Josh Schaefer as his Eagle project. The kiosk would be installed next to marina control building, where the vests would be easily accessible to boaters.

    The purpose of the program is to provide vests for boaters who don’t have enough of the safety devices for all their passengers, officials said.

    Funding for the project will come through the Department of Natural Resources, and the DNR will also provide 32 life jackets for the station, Schaefer told the Common Council last month.

    The life vest program started in Alaska in 1996, Schaefer said, and since then more than 2,100 life vest loaner stations have been installed throughout the U.S.

    Although there have been concerns that people would take the vests and not return them, that hasn’t typically happened, officials said.

    Instead, the number of vests available tends to grow as people donate the ones their children have outgrown, they said.

    But commission members noted that the marina staff will be expected to maintain the kiosk and vests, checking them to make sure they are in order.

    “Who’s going to be responsible for checking the straps?” commission member Tony Matera asked. “I’m not against this program. I just want to minimize the city’s liability. Now that you’ve got them, you have a duty to maintain them.

    “I’d feel better if we had a better idea of our duties. I think the question is how we implement it. Is it going to add another 10 hours of work for the staff each week?”

    Commission member Jerry Baganz said the panel supports the idea of the program.

    “I think this is something we think is a good idea, but we don’t fully understand the responsibility we’re taking on,” he said.

    Commission members questioned what would happen if the marina staff came in one morning and all the vests were missing.

    “We call the DNR and have them get us more vests,” Harbormaster Dennis Cherny said.

    Cherny agreed that the contract with the DNR should be reviewed by the city attorney to check on liability questions and the city’s responsibilities.

    However, he said, the program is valuable and workable for the marina.

    “I don’t see it as a big problem,” he said. “Certainly we can do it. I think we should do it.”

    The marina staff will also be tasked with checking the availability of life rings and ladders on the breakwater when they are installed, Cherny said. This task can be conducted largely by sight, he said, with staff using binoculars to make sure the rings are on their stands and the ladders are intact.

    Matera suggested that instead of the kiosk the marina could buy a couple life vests to loan to boaters in need and store them inside the marina office, eliminating much of the possibility of vandalism and damage to the equipment.

    Ald. Dave Larson, a commission member, said that when the Common Council approved the program, he thought the DNR would carry the bulk of the responsibility for maintaining the vests, not the marina.

    He said he will and mention the commission’s concerns to other aldermen and may bring the matter back to the Common Council for reconsideration at its July 16 meeting.

    Cherny said he will check with other marinas that have implemented the program to see what the community’s responsibility actually is and how onerous it is.

City stands firm on sidewalk assessments PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 02 July 2013 17:38

Port aldermen agree to charge residents on Parknoll Lane, Seven Hills Road for installation despite protests

    Port Washington aldermen on Monday moved ahead with plans to assess residents of Parknoll Lane and Seven Hills Road for sidewalk that will be installed in front of their homes as part of road reconstruction projects this summer.

    However, aldermen agreed not to install sidewalk along a portion of Second Avenue where the street is not being rebuilt.

    The decision follows the city’s policy to install sidewalk in places where there is none when the street is being reconstructed, City Administrator Mark Grams told aldermen Monday.
  “Only a portion of Second Avenue is being reconstructed at this time,” he said. “When we do put the rest of the street in, we should add it.”

    But on Parknoll Lane the street is being rebuilt and thus the city should install sidewalk, Grams said.

    “When there is no sidewalk on a street being reconstructed, it’s our policy to add sidewalk,” he said.

    There is sidewalk on a portion of the street, he said, but it abruptly stops.

    “Since you have a dead-end sidewalk, it does make sense to extend the sidewalk (north) to Seven Hills Road,” Grams said.

    The sidewalk assessments have been controversial as residents from both areas appeared before the Common Council during a public hearing last month to ask that the walkways be eliminated from street construction plans.

    Although about 20 of these residents attended Monday’s meeting, there was no time allotted on the agenda for public comment.

    That’s standard with special meetings, Grams said Tuesday, although he said officials frequently allow the public time to comment.

    Two residents — Karen Makoutz of 1924 Parknoll La. and John Poull, president of the Birchwood Hills Condominium Association — distributed letters to aldermen opposing the sidewalk before the meeting.

    Poull said after the meeting he was “totally disappointed” with the decision.

    “There’s a lot of people who were spitting mad,” he said of the crowd. “This is a piece of property that really doesn’t need a sidewalk.”

    Many residents argued at the public hearing that the sidewalk is unnecessary, noting people in the area use the Ozaukee Interurban Trail that runs through their neighborhood, and would exacerbate drainage issues that already exist.

    Poull said in his letter that the association has spent more than $41,000 on drainage issues, adding he fears the situation will only get worse with the installation of sidewalks.

    “It’s going to be a mess,” he predicted.

    The association had proposed that the city install sidewalk only on the east side of the road, noting its members would be willing to split the cost with property owners on that side of the street, he said.

    They also suggested building a walkway that would link Parknoll Lane with the bike trail, saying this would better serve residents.

    Although some concerns were expressed about the possibility of trees needing to be removed for the new sidewalk, Public Works Director Rob Vanden Noven said the city can accommodate virtually all of them, with potentially one or two exceptions, if residents grant the city temporary easements to grade behind the walkway.

    “Any tree we remove we will replace,” he said, adding that more trees will be planted in spring along that stretch of road.

    Similarly, Vanden Noven said, the city needs temporary easements for grading to pitch the sidewalk toward the street to help ease drainage concerns.

    Ald. Mike Ehrlich said he struggled with the issue, noting he received an almost equal number of calls from people in favor of the walkways and opposed to them.

    “I’m kind of torn,” he said. “I do like the fact Rob is confident we can help with the drainage, and we can add trees.”

    Sidewalks will also help improve safety in an area where motorists often speed, Ehrlich added.

    “By adding sidewalks, you do add safety,” he said. “If I had my way, we would be narrowing all the streets to slow down traffic.”

Thieves target unlocked vehicles in Port PDF Print E-mail
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 26 June 2013 18:44

A 70-year-old Port Washington man reported to police Saturday that approximately $300 in cash was taken from his unlocked vehicle while it was parked in the driveway of his house in the 1500 block of Scott Road overnight.

    It was the most recent incident in which thieves and vandals have targeted unlocked vehicles.

    Roughly a half-dozen incidents of thefts from vehicles have been reported in June, Police Chief Kevin Hingiss said.

    “I would like to stop this before it gets worse,” he said. “The best way for people to avoid this is to lock their cars at night or, at the very least, make sure there are no valuables left in the car.”

    In some cases, Hingiss said, thieves have used unlocked side garage doors to access vehicles during the night.

    On June 18, a 43-year-old woman reported that someone entered a vehicle parked overnight at her house in the 400 block of Grand Avenue. Items from the vehicle were strewn in the street, but nothing was taken, she said.  

    Two years ago, the city was hit with a spate of thefts from unlocked vehicles during the summer months. Thieves took everything from small electronics to sunglasses and spare change in more than 30 cases reported from May to September 2011.

    In other police news:
    •  A group of young adults were warned by police after they were reported to be on the roof of the Ozaukee County Administration Center, 121 W. Main St.
    They told police they were participating in parkour, a free-walking activity in which people try to move with maximum efficiency while negotiating obstacles.

    The officer told the youths that if they don’t own the property, they should stay off.

    • Police received a call at 10:45 a.m. June 16 from a person locked in the bathroom on the north side of Old Theatre Square, 116 W. Grand Ave. The handle to the room was apparently broken, and there was no one else in the building to help, the person told police.
   Officers brought in a carpenter to remove the handle and trim and free the caller.

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