Share this page on facebook
Daily News
Maritime Fest celebration to mark tall ship’s return to Port PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 13 August 2014 18:43

Annual salute to city’s heritage this weekend will feature variety of changes

    A tall ship will return to the harbor this weekend for Maritime Heritage Festival — the first of many changes, some obvious and others not, for the annual fest.

    The festival, which will be held in Coal Dock and Rotary parks, runs from noon to 9 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.

    While this is the 14th annual festival, it is the first one that isn’t sponsored by Port Main Street Inc.

    An independent nonprofit agency, Port Washington Maritime Heritage Festival Inc., was formed to take over the festival — a task that took time and led the group to consider delaying the event for a year.

    But, group president Sara Grover said, some “significant” sponsors were committed to holding this year’s event and board members believe continuity is important for the festival.

    Being a new sponsoring agency did bring some challenges, she said, including fundraising. This year, the festival didn’t have the $10,000 contribution from Main Street Inc., and it didn’t have its nonprofit designation in place in time to obtain funds from Port Washington Tourism Council either.

    But a number of new sponsors signed on and the group raised enough funds and sponsorships to put on this year’s event, Grover said.

    This year’s festival is operating with a $73,000 budget, one of the smallest in its history, she said.

    While some things had to be cut or trimmed back — there won’t be fireworks this year — organizers are confident they are putting on an event that will offer something for everyone and won’t leave them facing a deficit, she said, adding that the group has prepaid many of its expenses.

    This year’s festival will once again feature a tall ship, something that wasn’t possible last year, Grover said.

     The Peacemaker, a wooden, 140-foot, three-masted barquentine, is expected to arrive around noon Thursday and be open for deck tours throughout the weekend.

    The square-rigged tall ship was built on a riverbank in southern Brazil using traditional methods and the finest tropical hardwoods. The ship was launched in 1989 as the Avany, a name chosen by her designer and owner, Brazilian industrialist Frank Walker, who planned to travel and operate it as a charter vessel in the Caribbean.

    The ship traveled to Savannah, Georgia, where the family intended to rig her as a three-masted staysail schooner. But other interests captured the family’s attention, and in 2000 it was purchased by The Twelve Tribes. Renamed The Peacemaker, it set sail for the first time in the spring of 2007.

    This is only the second time the ship has been on the Great Lakes, Grover said.

    The Peacemaker will be moored off Coal Dock Park, while the other vessels open for deck tours — the Ozaukee County rescue boat and a Coast Guard boat — will be off Rotary Park.

    Deck tours will be $6, and tickets are available online or at the event.

    A special evening reception aboard the Peacemaker will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday. A fundraiser for the festival, tickets are $15 and include music and a food and beverage tasting. Tickets may be purchased online.

    Also in the harbor for the festival will be Lakeside Spirit, which will offer 45-minute tours. Tickets are $13 for children and senior citizens and $25 for adults.

    Also at Rotary Park will be an antique boat display, music in the gazebo and, at 2 p.m. Saturday, the annual cardboard boat regatta.

    Those attending the festival will be able to walk between the parks via the harborwalk, which will be lined with informational boards and a Port Washington-based trivia game, or take a shuttle bus provided by Johnson Bus, Grover said.

    The shuttle will also stop at the Port Washington Historical Society’s research center, which will feature new exhibits and be open throughout much of the festival.

    Coal Dock Park will feature a large, classic Ferris wheel at the east end, near the children’s area.

    “We wanted to bring in something that will draw the eye out to the end of the park and give people a unique view,” Grover said.

    From the top of the Ferris wheel, riders will be able to take in expansive views not just of the city but of the area north and south of the community as well, she said.

    The children’s area will include an area where children can build and race wooden boats, as well as an obstacle course and arts and crafts.

    A stage will be set up in the park where Friday’s headliner, Nobody’s Hero, will perform classic rock at 5:30 p.m.

    On Saturday, Vinyl Groove will play at 1:30 p.m. followed by Familiar Looking Strangers will take the stage at 6:30 p.m.

    Sunday, the reggae band In Black ‘N White will perform from 1 to 5 p.m.

    This year will also mark the inaugural run of the Land Regatta at 9 a.m. Saturday. The event will have two and four-mile courses, and proceeds will go toward the cost of a railing on the Coal Dock Park promenade.

    For additional information and tickets for the harbor tours, visit www.portmaritimefestival.com or call (262) 689-3299.


 
Street work around PWHS expected to be done by Aug. 29 PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 13 August 2014 18:40

Summer road repairs that have frustrated motorists scheduled for completion before the start of classes

    The streets around Port Washington High School should be open by the time classes begin next month, officials said Tuesday.

    The contractor, Wood Sewer and Excavating Inc. of New London, has made good progress in the last week, and should be able to get the project done by the Aug. 29 deadline, Port Washington Public Works Director Rob Vanden Noven said.

    “I see no reason why he can’t get it done,” Vanden Noven said. “He’s determined to finish it on time so there aren’t any problems. He knows how important it is. He said they’ll work on Saturdays if they have to.

    “He is committed to having it done on time, and we are committed to making sure he fulfills that promise.”streetLG
    Curbs and gutters were installed this week, and the remainder of the concrete work — which includes sidewalk replacements and driveway aprons — are expected to be done as well, Vanden Noven said.

    The asphalt roadway is expected to be built next week, he said, with landscaping and pavement markings done after that.

    “The only question is whether Holden Street will be completed from Orchard Street to Van Buren,” Vanden Noven said. “We have emphasized it’s important it be completed as well.”

    Holden Street will likely be open to traffic during drop-off and pick-up times even if it’s not completed, he said, acknowledging it’s a key route for people going to and from the high school.

    It’s not the road construction that’s likely to be incomplete on Holden Street, Vanden Noven said, but landscaping. That work can be done during non-peak traffic hours.

    During a progress meeting Aug. 7, Vanden Noven said, the contractor said one problem that delayed the work is that he had to excavate more than expected because the fill used around the high school was not adequate.

    But while the work is progressing, it hasn’t been without problems.

    A crew installing storm sewers cut a fiber optic line on Thursday that apparently hadn’t been marked on the pavement, Vanden Noven said.

    That meant phone and Internet service to the schools were out, stymieing parents and school officials.

 
Input sought on downtown redevelopment PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 13 August 2014 18:25

Aug. 18 workshop will give Port residents a chance to comment on site plans

    Port Washington residents will be asked for their input on potential downtown redevelopment plans during a workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday, Aug. 18.

    The workshop, hosted by the city’s Community Development Authority and its consultant, Community Design Solutions, will give those attending the opportunity to comment on plans for four potential redevelopment sites and two open spaces downtown.


    Those redevelopment sites include two city-owned parking lots, vacant space at the north end of the Port Harbor Center and the Sauk Creek corridor from Wisconsin Street west to Jadair Inc., Mayor Tom Mlada said, adding the open space sites are near the marina.


    “These are areas that could be catalytic,” Mlada said, and prompt additional development in the community.


    The concept plans will include building footprints, parking areas, landscaping and proposed uses. Pedestrian and bike lanes could also be included.


    The proposed uses are likely to mixed, Mlada said, combining residential and commercial uses to maximize these underused areas of the downtown.


    Following the presentation, those attending will break into small groups to discuss the various properties.


    “We’ll ask people what do you like, what should we have included, what would you like to see done differently,” said Randy Tetzlaff, the city’s director of planning and development.


    CDS has come up with potential plans for these sites with an eye toward obtaining public input, Tetzlaff said.


    “People need to have something specific to react to,” he said.  


    The goal, he said, isn’t necessarily to get specific design ideas but a broader sense of what the city needs downtown.


    Mlada said the workshop is important to the city so it, not developers, controls the fate of downtown.


    Investment in downtown will happen, and the city needs to take the lead to ensure that developments align with the priorities of the community, he said.


    Proper development will help the city overall, making the downtown a year-round destination, increasing the tax base and adding jobs, Mlada said.
Daily-Press

    “It’s really our choice — do we take the lead and set our vision or do we wait for others to take the lead?” he said.


    Following Monday’s meeting, CDS will fine-tune its plans and present them to the city, Tetzlaff said.


    The workshop will be inthe second floor conference room at Ansay & Associates, 110 S. Wisconsin St.

 
Four vie for GOP nod in Congressional race PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 06 August 2014 20:08

Winner of primary race for Petri’s seat to face Democrat in November

    While the increasingly contentious race between Rob Brooks and Jean Opitz, the Republican candidates for the 60th District Assembly seat, is at the forefront of many voters’ minds, it is but one choice that will be before voters on Tuesday, Aug. 12.

    Voters will also face a slate of Republican candidates seeking the 6th Congressional District seat being vacated by Rep. Tom Petri.

    Vying for the seat are State Senators Glenn Grothman and Joe Leibham, State Rep. Duey Stroebel and Tom Denow.

    The candidates have all vowed to help repeal the Affordable Care Act, said they would consider voting to impeach President Barack Obama and called for a more conservative voice in government.

    The winner of the primary will face Democrat Mark Harris and Libertarian Gus Fahrendorf in the Nov. 4 general election.

    On a local level, voters will cast their ballots for three county offices.

    Clerk of Courts Mary Lou Mueller is seeking re-election to her post, while Undersheriff Jim Johnson is seeking to become sheriff, a job being vacated by Maury Straub.

    Chief Deputy Coroner Timothy Deppisch is seeking to become coroner, a post currently held by John Holicek, who is not seeking re-election.

    The winners of the county primaries face no opposition in the November general election.

    County voters will also cast votes in a number of state primary races.

    Democrats Mary Burke and Brett Hulsey are vying for the chance to challenge Gov. Scott Walker in November, while Democrats John Lehman and Mary Jo Walters are seeking the chance to oppose Rebecca Kleefisch for lieutenant governor.

    Susan Happ, Ismael Ozanne and Jon Richards are Democrats hoping to be placed on the November ballot for attorney general, facing Republican Brad Schimel.

    Republicans Julian Bradley and Garey Bies are vying for the chance to oppose Democrat Doug LaFollette, the incumbent, and Constitution Party candidate Jerry Broitzman in the race for secretary of state.

    And Republicans Matt Adamczyk and Randall Melchert will face off in the race for state treasurer, while Democrats Dave Leeper and David Sartori will do the same. The winners will be on the Nov. 4 ballot, as will Constitution Party candidate Andrew Zuelke.

    Voters are only allowed to cast ballots for candidates in one political party during the primary.

    The polls open at 7 a.m. Tuesday and close at 8 p.m.



 

 
Port’s first beer garden event to be hosted Saturday PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by Ozaukee Press   
Wednesday, 06 August 2014 20:01

The first of five Port Washington beer garden events will be held in Upper Lake Park on Saturday, Aug. 9.

    The beer garden, which will be sponsored and staffed by the Port Washington-Saukville Rotary Club, will be in the shelter on the south side of the park.

    The Port Washington-Saukville Jaycees will sponsor the Aug. 23 beer garden, followed by the Veterans of Foreign Wars on Aug. 30, the Port Washington Waterfront Safety Committee on Sept. 20 and the Port Washington Lions Club on Sept. 27.

    While the basics of each event will remain the same — each held on a Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., with the sponsoring groups offering a selection of music, food and beverages, including water, soft drinks and, of course, beer — there will be some differences.

    Each group will determine which beers and foods it will offer, giving each event a personality of its own.

    The beer gardens were the brainchild of Patti Lemkuil, a member of the Parks and Recreation Board who said she was looking for something to replace the Freeport Music Series, which this year held only one summer concert instead of the traditional three or four.

    Beer gardens are a trend today, said Lemkuil, who added that she was inspired by the beer garden at Estabrook Park in Milwaukee.

    “We really want to bring the community together and create a lot of camaraderie,” she said. “We’re trying to make this charming and traditional.

    “We are encouraging people to bring their own mugs and to bring a picnic basket. We want everyone to be comfortable and to meet friends, family and new people as well.”

    Lemkuil said people are talking about the beer gardens, and she hopes they will embrace the concept.

    “We’re hoping people embrace it, and if they embrace it, we’re thinking it will come back next year,” she said.

 
Police want man who fired shot that struck house charged PDF Print E-mail
Daily News
Written by KRISTYN HALBIG ZIEHM   
Wednesday, 06 August 2014 20:00

Gun owner said he didn’t know revolver was loaded

    Port Washington police have asked the district attorney’s office to charge a 57-year-old man with endangering safety with a firearm after he allegedly shot his gun while cleaning it, sending a bullet into a neighbor’s home.

    According to police, the man, who lives on West Melin Street, told officers he thought the .38-caliber gun was empty when he cleaned it July 31, but the weapon went off. He looked around to see where the bullet had gone, but couldn’t find it.

    About 9:30 a.m. on Aug. 1, his neighbors found bullet holes in three doors at their house and called police.

    The bullet had traveled through the man’s kitchen window to the neighbor’s house, where it went through the screen and storm doors and down a hallway before lodging in a third door inside the home, police said.

    When told what caused the holes in their doors, the neighbors told officers they had heard a loud banging about 9:30 p.m. the previous night but did not realize it was a gunshot, according to police.

    In other police news, a 7-year-old Saukville girl was bitten by an American bulldog while visiting a home on Pier Street  in Port Washington July 30.

    She was taken for a medical examination, and the physician notified authorities of the bite. The dog will be quarantined for 10 days, police said.

    A cat was also ordered quarantined that day after it bit its owner.badge

    And a 29-year-old Port Washington woman was cited for having an animal at large after her cat was loose in her neighborhood and tore a screen at the neighbor’s house trying to get inside.

    Police are also asking the district attorney to charge an 18-year-old Port Washington man with possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia after a July 28 incident.

    The man was among a group of people arguing loudly in the pickup truck on South Spring Street about midnight when police discovered the drugs, police said

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 8 of 44