Enjoy the taste of summer year-round

Canning today’s fruits and vegetables ensures the flavors of the season will last throughout the year

It’s not what many want to think about, but the fact is old man winter isn’t too far off.
However, capturing scrumptious summer produce in a can can still be done.
Tomatoes and other fresh produce can be literally saved for a rainy or wintry day.
Kathleen Awe, a Master Gardener, Master Preserver and Master Composter from the Town of Cedarburg, suggests starting simple, with jellies and jams, which are simple and widely found delicious.
Practicing a little food safety goes a long way in the canning process, she said. Hand and produce washing are important, as is making sure all materials are as clean as possible. Awe recommends using Lysol.
Tomatoes, she said, require one teaspoon of bottled lemon juice for each pint, which is enough acid to combat botulism.
All kinds of produce can be canned. It will stay fresh for one year but can safely be kept longer, Awe said.
So the next time bone-chilling wind rips through your winter coat and you struggle home through snow and slushy conditions only to find a task of shoveling awaiting your arrival, remember a warm and sunny summer dinner is just minutes away.
The following are canning recipes from the University of Wisconsin-Extension.
For information on canning, visit https://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/safepreserving/recipes.

 

kathleen awe

Tomato Taco Sauce

8 quarts paste tomatoes, peeled, cored and finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, crushed
5 cups onions, chopped
4 jalapeño peppers, seeded and chopped
4 long green chilies, peeled, seeded and chopped
2-1⁄2 cups vinegar (5% acetic acid) or bottled lemon juice
2 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon red or black pepper
1 tablespoon sugar
2 tablespoons oregano leaves, optional
1 teaspoon ground cumin, optional

    Peel and prepare chili peppers, if desired. To peel tomatoes, dip in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds or until skins split, then dip in cold water and remove skins. Core and chop tomatoes.
    Combine ingredients in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer one hour, stirring frequently until thick.
    Ladle hot salsa into clean, hot pint jars, leaving 1⁄2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe jar rims and cap with properly pre-treated lids. Process in a boiling water canner for 15 minutes if at 1,000 feet elevation or lower or 20 minutes of between 1,001 and 6,000.
    Makes 16 to18 pints.
    This recipe works best with paste tomatoes such as Roma VF. Slicing tomatoes will yield a thin, watery sauce.

 

Spicy Cranberry Salsa

6 cups red onion, chopped
4 large Serrano peppers, finely chopped
1-1⁄2 cups water
1-1⁄2 cups cider vinegar (5% acetic acid)
1 tablespoon salt
1-1⁄3 cups sugar
6 tablespoons clover honey
12 cups fresh whole cranberries, rinsed

    Combine all ingredients except cranber-ries in a large pot and bring to a boil over high heat, stirring frequently. Reduce heat and boil gently for five minutes. Add cran- berries, reduce heat slightly and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    Ladle hot salsa into clean, hot pint or half-pint jars, leaving 1⁄4 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe jar rims and cap with properly pre-treated lids. Process in a boiling water canner for 15 minutes if at 1,000 feet    elevation or lower or 20 minutes if between 1,001 and 6,000 feet.
    Makes six pints.

Canned Cherries

    Pack fruit into clean, hot jars, shaking jars to get a full pack. To prevent browning, add 1⁄4 teaspoon ascorbic acid to each quart jar.
    Cover with boiling apple juice or white grape juice, water or sugar syrup, leaving 1⁄2-inch headspace. Remove bubbles and wipe jar rims clean. Adjust lids.
    Process in a boiling water canner for 25 minutes for pints or quarts.

 

Barbecue Sauce

4 quarts peeled, cored and chopped red ripe tomatoes
2 cups chopped celery
2 cups chopped onions
1-1⁄2 cups chopped sweet red or green peppers
2 hot red peppers, cored, and chopped
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 cup brown sugar
1 tablespoon dry mustard
1 tablespoon paprika
1 tablespoon canning salt
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
1⁄8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1-1⁄2 cups of (5%) vinegar

    Wash and rinse pint canning jars and keep hot until ready to use. Prepare lids according to manufacturer’s directions.
    Combine prepared tomatoes, celery, onions, and peppers. Cook about 30 minutes, until vegetables are soft. Puree using a fine sieve, food mill, food processor or blender. Cook about 45 minutes, until mixture is reduced by about half.
    Tie peppercorns in a cheesecloth bag, add with remaining ingredients and cook slowly until mixture is the consistency of catsup, about 1-1⁄2 to two hours, stirring frequently.
    Remove bag of peppercorns.
    Ladle hot sauce into clean, hot jars, leaving 1⁄2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel and apply two-piece metal canning lids.
    Process pints in a boiling water canner for 20 minutes if at 1,000 feet elevation or lower or 25 minutes if between 1,001 and 3,000 feet.
    Makes about four pints.

 

Fruit Cocktail

3 pounds peaches
3 pounds pears
1-1⁄2 pounds slightly under-ripe seedless green grapes
10 ounces maraschino cherries
3 cups sugar
4 cups water
    
    Stem and wash grapes, and keep in an antioxidant solution. Wash other fruits. Dip ripe but firm peaches, a few at a time, in boiling water for one to 1-1⁄2 minutes to loosen skins. Dip in cool water and slip off skins. Cut skinned peaches in half, remove pits, cut into 1⁄2-inch cubes and keep in anti-browning solution with grapes.
    Peel, halve and core pears. Cut into 1⁄2-inch cubes and keep in solution with grapes and peaches.
    Drain mixed fruit. Combine sugar and water in a saucepan and bring to boil to prepare syrup.
    Ladle 1⁄2 cup hot syrup into each clean, hot jar. Add a few cherries to each jar, then gently fill with mixed fruit and more hot syrup, leaving 1⁄2-inch headspace. Remove bubbles and wipe jar rims clean. Adjust lids.
    Process in a boiling water canner for 20 minutes for half-pint or pint jars.
    Makes about six pints
    To make an antioxidant solution, crush or grind vitamin C tablets to a fine powder. Use three 500 mg tablets per quart of water as a dip for sliced apples, peaches, pears or similar fruits while you get them ready. Place prepared fruit in the dip for one minute, then drain.

 

Pears

Wash and peel pears. Cut lengthwise into halves and remove cores. To prevent browning, dip pears in an antioxidant solution.
    Prepare a very light, light or medium syrup or pack pears in apple juice, pear juice or water. Boil drained pears for five minutes in syrup, juice or water.
    Fill clean, hot jars with hot pears and cooking liquid, leaving 1⁄2-inch head- space. Remove bubbles and wipe jar rims clean. Adjust lids.
    Process in a boiling water canner for 20 minutes for pint jars and 25 minutes for quarts.
    To make an antioxidant solution, crush or grind vitamin C tablets to a fine powder. Use three 500 mg tablets per quart of water as a dip for sliced apples, peaches, pears or similar fruits while you get them ready. Place prepared fruit in the dip for one minute, then drain.

 

Apple Pie Filling

6 quarts apples, blanched, sliced fresh
5-1⁄2 cups sugar
1-1⁄2 cups Clearjel
1 tablespoon cinnamon
2-1⁄2 cups cold water
5 cups apple juice
3⁄4 cup bottled lemon juice
1 teaspoon nutmeg, optional

    Use firm, crisp apples such as Stayman, Cortland, Golden Delicious or Rome. If apples lack tartness, add 1⁄4 cup more bottled lemon juice for each six quarts apple slices.
    Wash, peel and core apples. Cut into slices 1⁄2-inch wide and place in water containing ascorbic acid to prevent browning. Blanch two quarts at a time for one minute in boiling water, then drain. While blanching other batches of apples, keep blanched apples in a covered pot so they will stay warm.
    Combine sugar, Clearjel and cinnamon in a large kettle with water and apple juice. If desired, add nutmeg. Stir and cook on medium high heat until mixture thickens and begins to bubble. Add bottled lemon juice and boil one minute, stirring constantly. Fold in apple slices immediately and fill clean, hot jars with mixture without delay, leaving 1-inch headspace. Remove bubbles and wipe jar rims clean. Adjust lids.
    Process in a boiling water canner for 25 minutes for pints or quarts.
    Makes seven quarts.

 

Berry Syrup

6-1/2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries, cherries, grapes, raspberries and strawberries
6-3/4 cups sugar

    Wash, cap, stem, and crush fresh fruit in a saucepan. Heat to boiling and simmer five to 10 minutes, until soft. While hot, strain mixture through a colander and drain until cool enough to handle. Strain the collected juice through a double layer of cheesecloth or jelly bag. Discard the dry pulp.
    Combine 4-1⁄2 to 5 cups juice with sugar in a large saucepan, bring to boil, then simmer one minute.
    To make syrup with whole fruit pieces, save one or two cups fresh or frozen fruit, combine with the sugar and simmer as in making regular syrup.
    Remove from heat, skim off foam and fill into clean half-pint or pint jars, leaving 1⁄2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles, wipe jar rims and adjust lids.
    Process in a boiling water canner for 10 minutes for half-pints or pints.
    Makes nine half-pints.

 

 

 

Hot Pepper Salsa

5 pounds tomatoes
2 pounds chili peppers
1 pound onions
1 cup vinegar (5% acetic acid)
3 teaspoons salt
1⁄2 teaspoon pepper

    Jalapeño peppers and mild green peppers do not need to be peeled. Peel and prepare chili peppers if desired.
    To peel tomatoes, dip in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds, until skins split, then dip in cold water and remove skins.
    Core and chop tomatoes. Combine tomatoes with chopped peppers, onions, and remaining ingredients in a saucepan. Heat to boiling, reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    Ladle hot salsa into clean, hot pint jars, leaving 1⁄2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe jar rims and cap with properly pre-treated lids.
    Process in a boiling water canner.for 15 minutes at 1,000 feet elevation or lower or 20 minutes if between 1,001 and 6,000 feet.
    Makes six to eight pints

 

Blender Tomato Catsup

8 quarts tomatoes, chopped
2 pounds onions, chopped
2 pounds sweet peppers, mix of red and green, seeded and chopped
3 tablespoons dry mustard
1-1⁄2 tablespoons paprika
1-1⁄2 teaspoons whole allspice
1-1⁄2 tablespoons whole cloves
2 3-inch cinnamon sticks
9 cups brown sugar, firmly packed
1⁄4 cup canning or pickling salt
9 cups cider vinegar (5% acetic acid)

    Wash tomatoes and all vegetables. Dip tomatoes in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds, until skins split, then dip in cold water and slip off skins, core and quarter. Remove seeds from peppers and slice into strips. Peel and quarter onions.
    Place tomatoes, peppers and onions in a blender or food processor and process at high speed for five seconds.
    Pour into a three to four-gallon stockpot or large kettle and heat to boiling. Boil gently 60 minutes, stirring frequently.
    Add vinegar, brown sugar, salt and a spice bag containing the mustard, red pepper and other spices. Continue boiling and stirring frequently for one to two hours, until volume is reduced by one-half and catsup rounds up on a spoon with no separation of liquid and solids, reducing heat as needed to prevent scorching.
    Pour hot catsup into clean, hot pint canning jars, leaving 1⁄8-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles, wipe jar rims, and cap with properly pretreated lids.
Adjust lids.
    Process in a boiling water canner for 15 minutes if at 1,000 feet elevation or lower or 20 minutes if betwee  1,001 and 6,000  feet.
    To freeze, chill catsup quickly. Pour into freezer containers, leaving one-inch headspace. Label and date. Freeze at zero degrees or lower.
    For best quality, use within one year.
    Makes about nine pints.

 

Category:

Feedback:

Click Here to Send a Letter to the Editor

Ozaukee Press

Wisconsin’s largest paid circulation community weekly newspaper. Serving Port Washington, Saukville, Grafton, Fredonia, Belgium, as well as Ozaukee County government. Locally owned and printed in Port Washington, Wisconsin.

125 E. Main St.
Port Washington, WI 53074
(262) 284-3494
 

CONNECT


User login