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NOSD earns solid report card PDF Print E-mail
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Written by MARK JAEGER   
Wednesday, 12 November 2014 20:11

Annual accountability report says school district compares well with state

Grades have always been a big part of student life, but they are also becoming increasingly important for school districts.

That was the underlying message when the Northern Ozaukee School Board reviewed the 2013-14 School Accountability Reports for its schools.

The reports, prepared by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, gauge the general academic performance of students from around the state.

“The Northern Ozaukee School District received very positive news related to our school report cards and maintained a solid foundation as a district,” said Supt. Blake Peuse.

The scores are based on standardized testing, measuring reading achievement and growth and math achievement and growth.

All three of the district’s “brick and mortar” schools received scores in the “exceeds expectations” range.

Ozaukee Elementary School logged an overall score of 73.5, compared to last year’s score of 71.6. The statewide average score was 66.8.

Ozaukee Middle School received a composite grade of 73, which was actually a decline from last year’s grade of 78.

District officials said the disparity can be traced to the performance of specific students and the school’s small enrollment. Areas of concern are being addressed through intervention efforts.

The district’s best showing was at Ozaukee High School, with a score of 79.1. That is higher than last year’s showing of 76.1.

The district’s online charter school, Wisconsin Virtual Learning, also showed an improvement — boosting its composite score from 61 last year to 64.4 this year.

That score falls within the “meets expectations” range.

Overall, the district’s report card — which includes WVL — showed a score of 67.8. Its score last year was 69.9.

Peuse said there is a danger in giving the statewide scoring system greater significance than it deserves, stressing that the numbers don’t tell the entire story.

“We cannot look at the report card as the final say in whether a school or district are being successful,” he said.

“We must use this information, though, to help us shape our processes and procedures to create the continued growth that we expect from our schools and district on behalf of our students, parents and community members.”


 
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